Chemical composition and anti-inflamatory, anti-nociceptive and antipyretic activity of rhizome essential oil of Globba sessiliflora Sims. collected from Garhwal region of Uttarakhand

Document Type: Original article

Authors

1 Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Sciences and Humanities, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar, Uttarakhand, India

2 Department of Vet. Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences. G.B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar, Uttarakhand, India

3 Institute of Chemistry, Białystok University, Division of Environmental Chemistry, UL. Hurtowa 1,15-399, Białystok, Poland

Abstract

Background & Aim: Family Zingiberaceae is worldwide in   distribution. Plants of the zingiberaceae family are used in traditional   herbal folk medicine besides their uses in spices, cosmetic, ornamental, food   preservatives etc. In Uttarakhand the herbs grow from sub-tropical to   temperate region. Globba sessiliflora Simsrhizomes were collected at maturity stage in November from   Garhwal region of Uttarakhand, India. In present communication the medicinal   use of various zingiberaceous herb provoked us to study the chemical   diversity and pharmacological activity determination of this important   traditional herb.
Experimental: The essential oil was extracted using hydrodistillation   method and analyzed by GC-MS. Anti-inflamatory, anti-nociceptive and   antipyretic activities of essential oil were experimently determined using   mice model.
Results: The major compounds identified were β-eudesmol (27.6%), (E)-β-caryophyllene (24.3%), α-humulene   (3.0%), (6E)-nerolidol (4.1%),   caryophyllene oxide (9.7%), γ-eudesmol (6.4%) and τ-muurolol (8.3%) besides   other minor constituents. Essential oil of G. sessiliflora rhizome showed good anti-inflamatory,   anti-nociceptive and antipyretic activities at the dose level of 100 mg/kg   body weight. The oral administration of the essential oil exhibited no toxicity at 400, 600 and 800 mg/kg   b.wt. concentration. Ibuprofen, indomthacin and paracetamol were used as   standard drugs for comparison.
 Recommended applications/industries: G. sessiliflora essential oil can be used as herbal remedy for its nontoxicityanti-inflamatory, anti-nociceptive and antipyretic activities.

Keywords


Article Title [Persian]

ترکیب شیمیایی و فعالیت ضد التهاب، ضد درد و تب در اسانس ریزوم Globba sessiliflora جمع آوری شده از منطقه گاروال در اوتاراکند

Authors [Persian]

  • راوندرا کومار 1
  • پراکاش ام 1
  • پانت آنیل 1
  • کومار ماهش 2
  • ایسیدورو والاری 3
  • اسزپانیاک لچ 3
1 Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Sciences and Humanities, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar, Uttarakhand, India
2 Department of Vet. Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences. G.B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar, Uttarakhand, India
3 Institute of Chemistry, Białystok University, Division of Environmental Chemistry, UL. Hurtowa 1,15-399, Białystok, Poland
Abstract [Persian]

Background & Aim: Family Zingiberaceae is worldwide in   distribution. Plants of the zingiberaceae family are used in traditional   herbal folk medicine besides their uses in spices, cosmetic, ornamental, food   preservatives etc. In Uttarakhand the herbs grow from sub-tropical to   temperate region. Globba sessiliflora Simsrhizomes were collected at maturity stage in November from   Garhwal region of Uttarakhand, India. In present communication the medicinal   use of various zingiberaceous herb provoked us to study the chemical   diversity and pharmacological activity determination of this important   traditional herb.
Experimental: The essential oil was extracted using hydrodistillation   method and analyzed by GC-MS. Anti-inflamatory, anti-nociceptive and   antipyretic activities of essential oil were experimently determined using   mice model.
Results: The major compounds identified were β-eudesmol (27.6%), (E)-β-caryophyllene (24.3%), α-humulene   (3.0%), (6E)-nerolidol (4.1%),   caryophyllene oxide (9.7%), γ-eudesmol (6.4%) and τ-muurolol (8.3%) besides   other minor constituents. Essential oil of G. sessiliflora rhizome showed good anti-inflamatory,   anti-nociceptive and antipyretic activities at the dose level of 100 mg/kg   body weight. The oral administration of the essential oil exhibited no toxicity at 400, 600 and 800 mg/kg   b.wt. concentration. Ibuprofen, indomthacin and paracetamol were used as   standard drugs for comparison.





Recommended applications/industries: G. sessiliflora essential oil can be used as herbal remedy for its nontoxicityanti-inflamatory, anti-nociceptive and antipyretic activities.

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